“Face It, Parents” Spring Break Campaign Wants to Keep Kids Active

March 19, 2010

 A Spring Break campaign gets under way this week raising  awareness about the dangers of underage drinking, keeping kids healthy, and offering alternatives.

“We know that at Spring Break or during any extended time away from school one of the key points for parents is keeping their kids active and busy,” says Emily Moser, Oregon Partnership’s Parenting Programs Director.

During Spring Break, teens should enjoy their time off in healthy ways, such as sports, outdoor activities, art projects and volunteering in the community.

A list of suggested activities and links will be featured on Oregon Partnership’s website at www.orpartnership.org.

The campaign is part of the Oregon Department of Human Services “Face it, Parents” underage drinking prevention initiative, coordinated by Oregon Partnership and Community Action to Reduce Substance Abuse (CARSA).

A letter from Portland area law enforcement officials, including Portland Police Chief, Rosie Sizer and Multnomah County Sheriff Daniel Staton,  will be going out to parents explaining that to help prevent underage drinking, parents have more influence over their teens than anyone.

Free movie tickets (limit of two per request) for the week of March 22nd will also be available on the website while supplies last.  The tickets will be good for admission to any Regal theater.  Just call Oregon Partnership at 503-244-5211.

Face it, Parents public service announcements will be airing on radio stations, KGON (92.3 FM), The Buzz (105.1 FM) and K-103 (103.3 FM).

Suggestions for parents:
    *Talk to each of your children and express your strong disapproval of  
     underage alcohol and drug use.  This is a very powerful step!

     *Tell your teens they may not go to parties where alcohol or drugs are consumed, but remind them that they can always call you if they get into a bad situation.  Still, check with other parents before you allow your teen to attend a party.

    *Monitor your home alcohol supplies.  Kids often get alcohol from homes.  Consider a lock for your liquor cabinet or storing less alcohol in your home, and track alcohol supplies.

 *Report any suspected parties to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission’s dispatch center at (503) 872-5070.
 
     *Plan fun activities for your teen and family.  For activity ideas during spring break, visit www.orpartnership.org.  Don’t be fooled when your kids says it’s not cool to do things with parents. They really value the time you spend with them. 

          For more information about underage drinking and resources for families,   
          visit www.FaceitParents.com.

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OP Launches “New Face It, Parents” Effort

January 8, 2010

Oregon Partnership’s Youth Advisory Council was busy during the Christmas break recording a public service announcement focusing on one important way parents can prevent teen drinking: By listening to their kids.

The PSA written and recorded by teens will air throughout the state on as many as 100 radio stations thanks to a program for non-profits sponsored by the Oregon Association of Broadcasters.

The spots are being produced free of charge by Entercom Radio of Portland, a longtime supporter of Oregon Partnership and the “Face It, Parents” campaign.

The message about listening and then following up on red flags (such as teen parties where adults aren’t present) is essential to preventing underage drinking.

Parents who listen to their teens and talk early and often about the dangers of alcohol and drugs have been proven to be largely successful in keeping their kids safe and healthy.

Drug prevention works, and if there’s any doubt, parents have the biggest influence on their kids.  So listen and communicate.


Underage Drinking, Teen Drug Use Down in Oregon

December 22, 2009

 
There’s a positive trend happening in Oregon involving high schoolers and middle schoolers.  And  in very large part, it has to do with parents taking a larger role in preventing underage drinking and teen drug abuse.
 
And for that, parents should be congratulated!
 
According to the Oregon Health Teens Survey, alcohol use among 11th graders and 8th graders (the classes surveyed) continues to go down.  The same is true for illegal drugs, except for marijuana and the illegal use of prescription drugs.
 
The survey reports that the percentage of 11th graders who used alcohol in the month before they were asked the question, came in at 38 percent, compared to 44 percent in 2007.
 
The Oregon Department of Human Services tells us that for 8th graders, the downward trend started showing up in 2005.  And there’s more good news: Illegal drugs use and smoking by teens continue to drop almost every year.
 
Drug prevention experts here at Oregon Partnership say this isn’t by accident. The biggest factor has to do with parents taking a much more active role in talking to their kids early and often about the dangers and effects of alcohol, drugs and tobacco.
 
There’s a reason why most public service announcements you see and hear about underage drinking and illegal drug use among teens are aimed at PARENTS.  Parents, after all, have the most influence on their children.
 
Unfortunately, more Oregon teens smoke marijuana than smoke cigarettes, and here in Oregon and nationally too, more teens are abusing prescription drugs. 

 Those are trends that anti-drug coalitions around the country will be targeting in the coming months, initiating “lock your meds” campaigns, among other strategies.


Oregon Partnership Launches Spring Break Campaign

March 5, 2009

A Spring Break campaign, targeting parents and teens, gets underway this week to raise awareness about the dangers of underage drinking and offers healthy alternatives.

The campaign is part of the statewide Face it, Parents underage drinking prevention initiative and coordinated by Oregon Partnership and Community Action to Reduce Substance Abuse (CARSA).

As part of the effort, letters from Portland area police chiefs are being sent to parents, schools, and community groups explaining how best to keep kids safe during Spring Break.

Those sending out the letters include Portland Police Chief Rosie Sizer, Multnomah County Sheriff Bob Skipper, Gresham Police Chief Craig Junginger, Troutdale Police Chief Scott Anderson, and Fairview Police Chief Kenneth Johnson.

“Teens are drinking way too much in Multnomah County,” Sizer and Skipper tell parents. “We want to prevent underage drinking, and the truth is that you, as a parent have more influence over your teenager than we do.”

The letters also warn parents about the impact of alcohol on the developing adolescent brain and how it can damage brain development by to up 10%.

During Spring Break, teens should enjoy their time off in healthy ways, such as sports, outdoor activities, art projects and volunteering in the community.

A list of suggested activities and links will be featured on Oregon Partnership’s website at www.orpartnership.org.

Free Tri-Met bus passes for the week of March 23rd will also be available on the website while supplies last.

Face it, Parents public service announcements written and recorded by Marshall High School students will air on KKCW FM (K-103) and streamed on the station website.

On the TV side, Face It, Parents PSA’s produced by the Art Institute of Portland will air on KPTV(Fox 12).
Suggestions for parents:
   *Talk to each of your children and express your strong disapproval of  
     underage alcohol and drug use.  This is a very powerful step!

     *Tell your teens they may not go to parties where alcohol or drugs are consumed, but remind them that they can always call you if they get into a bad situation.  Still, check with other parents before you allow your teen to attend a party.

    *Monitor your home alcohol supplies.  Kids often get alcohol from homes.  Consider a lock for your liquor cabinet or storing less alcohol in your home, and track alcohol supplies.

 *Report any suspected parties to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission’s dispatch center at (503) 872-5070.
 
     *Plan fun activities for your teen and family.  For activity ideas during spring break, visit www.orpartnership.org.  Don’t be fooled when your kids says it’s not cool to do things with parents; they really value the time you spend with them. 
          For more information about underage drinking and resources for families,   
          visit www.FaceitParents.com.


Parents Allowing Teens to Drink at Home: Big-Time Mistake

July 24, 2008

Every so often, I read something about how this country could cut down on binge drinking by college students if parents would just allow their teens to experience small amounts of alcoholic beverages at home and learn how to drink responsibly.

This month in the Lake Oswego Review, a  teen wrote a piece pointing out that kids in Europe start drinking at home at an early age.  And if only kids didn’t have to be put up with scare tactics from their parents, they’d be so much better off and not have to go crazy once they’re out of the house and on to college.

I agree with the young author on the scare tactics part. Good information and education doesn’t have to be freightening or threatening.  But almost everything else he got wrong big time.

Here’s the reality:

*European countries have major problems with alcoholism and underage binge drinking – a lot worse than here.  Most governments there are starting to crack down on underage drinking, alcohol sales, and driving under the influence.  So much for how wonderful it is to allow kids to drink at home.

*Medical science has discovered in just the past ten years that there is a direct correlation between the age a person begins drinking and whether he or she experiences alcohol problems as an adult.  The top national experts in the addictions field say a kid who starts drinking at 15 or 16 has a five times bigger chance of grappling with alcohol addiction as an adult.  The adolescent brain is a developing brain, and alcohol and/or drugs absolutely affects several aspects of brain development.

*If parents allow their kids to drink at home, it is enabling an activity that is not only dangerous to the health of that kid, but illegal.  There are good reasons why you can’t – or shouldn’t – drink until you’re 21.

If parents really want to be successful in preventing their kids from abusing alcohol, they need to help change the culture that says drinking is a right of passage and start talking to their kids early and often.  Parents are the biggest influence on kids – yeah, even bigger than peer pressure.

There is a reason why the percentage of young people smoking cigarettes continues to drop.  Since kindergarden, they’ve learned how unhealthy it is.  I dare say parents wouldn’t tell their kids it’s OK to light up a cigarette after dinner.  The same should hold true for underage drinking.

Pete Schulberg, Communications Director

Oregon Partnership


Parents, Don’t Miss: Keeping Your Kids Safe on the Internet

July 14, 2008

Practical Advice for Parenting Your Hi-Tech Kids!

Wednesday, October 1
12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
at Montgomery Park
2701 NW Vaughn Avenue
Portland 97210
Only $30, Including Lunch!
Register Now! Parking is Free!

The very latest on what YOU can do to keep your family safe and informed about the ever-changing online universe.

The training will be led by Shawn Marshall, Licensed Professional Counselor at the Children’s Program, a Portland diagnostic & treatment clinic.

Shawn says “Kids aren’t as savvy when it comes to the unexpected ramifications of instant messaging, their MySpace page and all the other uses of the Internet. And that’s where informed parenting comes in.”

Here is what you’ll learn:

  • How to protect your family’s privacy online
  • Understanding “digital footprints”
  • Why most online identities are fake
  • How to deal with cyber harassment
  • How using filters can create a false sense of security
  • Can addiction really occur

To Register, email Danny Slifman or call 503-244-5211.

Click here to download the training flyer.

Brought to you by Oregon Partnership, a statewide non-profit working promoting healthy kids and communities by raising awareness about drug and alcohol issues, providing drug prevention education in classrooms, and 24-hour crisis lines for callers needing help.

To learn more, visit www.orpartnership.org.


Keeping Your Kids Alcohol and Drug Free: Super Panel

April 18, 2008

Parents of Portland area children in grade school, middle school and high school: Here’s the special summer event you don’t want to miss!

Wednesday, June 25, noon – 1:30 p.m.
at Montgomery Park
2701 NW Vaughn Avenue, Portland 97210
Only $25, Including Lunch!
Register Now! Parking is Free!

When it comes to alcohol and drug prevention, parents are the biggest influence on kids. Hear from an expert panel on what you can do to keep your kids away from alcohol and drugs.

Practical advice for parents and families!

The latest information on what the research says about prevention, and what works

How to talk to your kids about alcohol and drugs – from grade school to high school

The adolescent brain and how to understand it!

Scheduled Panelists:

  • Pamela Erickson – Manager of “Face it, Parents” underage drinking prevention campaign
  • Stephen Grant – Therapist, social worker in Portland schools
  • Emily Moser – Parenting Programs Director, Oregon Partnership
  • Bonnie Nagel, Ph.D – Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, OHSU, adolescent brain researcher
  • Marvin Seppala, M.D. – Psychiatrist and Medical Director of Beyond Addictions in-home detox and outpatient addiction treatment program, international speaker
  • Linda Sneddon – Child and Family Prevention Program Coordinator for LifeWorks NW
  • The Honorable Nan Waller – Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge, Multnomah County Commission on Children, Families & Community

Panel discussion will be led by Pete Schulberg, Communications Director at Oregon Partnership, a statewide non-profit working to promote healthy kids and communities by raising awareness about drug and alcohol issues, providing drug prevention education in classrooms, and 24-hour crisis lines for callers needing help.

To learn more, visit www.orpartnership.org.

To Register, email Danny Slifman at dslifman@orpartnership.org or call 503-244-5211.

Click here to download the event flyer.